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VICTOR JOECKS: CCSD to have students role-play asking for sex

The Clark County School District can’t keep kids safe or teach them to read, so now it wants them to role-play asking each other for sex.

On Thursday, the board approved changes to the district’s sex education curriculum. That includes a lesson plan for high school students titled, “Rights, respect, responsibility: Don’t have sex without them.”

Notice the underlying assumption in that title, which is found throughout the lesson. It’s OK to have sex — even if you’re 14 — as long as you follow the listed rules. Another implication is that everyone else is doing it. If you have reservations about being sexually active as a teenager — which you should — you must be weird. Finally, there’s no mention of parents. The message is that high school students don’t need to worry about what their mom and dad think about this subject.

The majority of the lesson is based on students acting out scenarios. In theory, it’s supposed to demonstrate the nuances of obtaining consent. In practice, students will be role-playing situations about initiating sex.

Here’s one scenario from the lesson which involves two people in a relationship. The first person’s prompt says, “You’re going to let (the other person) know that tonight is the night — you’re going to have sex together for the first time.”

The second person’s prompt says, “You’ve been doing a lot of touching without having any type of sex (vaginal, oral or anal) and you haven’t said what you do or don’t want.”

Here’s another scenario. A couple have been dating for three months. The first person thinks it’s time to have sex. The second person also thinks it’s time to have sex. However, “You just really are nervous about being naked and having sex.”

This is wildly inappropriate. Schools shouldn’t force students to envision, let alone act out in front of their peers, how to “appropriately” push a classmate into sex. They shouldn’t have to perform a skit in which they share their willingness to have sex if they can overcome their discomfort about nudity.

The lesson contains no discussion about the benefits of abstinence until you are married. No talk about the emotional aspect of sex, how it isn’t merely a physical act and unites two people in a unique way. Nothing about how fleeting feelings — especially when you’re a teenager — are a garbage way to make life-altering decisions. Or how many people regret having sex at an early age. Or STDs.

The lesson does include this, “You may notice language throughout the curriculum that seems less familiar.” That includes “referring to ‘someone with a vulva’ vs. a girl or woman. This is intended to make the curriculum inclusive.”

It was once considered derogatory to reduce a woman to her private parts. Now, it’s part of district curriculum.

It’s not just high school materials that are inappropriate. Here’s a part of a supplemental workbook for fifth-grade girls on “discovering new feelings.”

“Some may begin to explore intimate parts of their body, especially the genital area,” the material states. “This is not right or wrong, but it’s personal and should be done in private.”

That is a thinly veiled reference to masturbation aimed at 10-year-olds.

It also includes the left’s radical gender theory. The text claims, “Everyone’s gender identity is unique to them.” So much for science.

It’s fine for the district to teach the biological realities of sex. But this curriculum goes far beyond that. It’s encouraging students to have sex with the only gatekeepers being their own feelings and getting another person’s agreement.

The district will be actively contradicting the values many parents are likely trying to instill in their children. It’s another reason Nevada needs school choice. But parents have a decision to make now. If possible, get your kids — or grandkids — out of the district.

Contact Victor Joecks at vjoecks@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-4698. Follow @victorjoecks on Twitter.

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